Tuitorial By: Prof

Due in 18 hours.

Note: You are strongly encouraged to complete the assessments in this course in the order in which they are presented. Preparation Before you create and submit your assessment, complete the following: Review the results of your STAR assessment and look for credible, professional resources on leadership and managing stressful situations. Complete one of the emotional intelligence (EI) assessments (linked in the Resources) and find credible, professional resources on EI in business. Directions Read the requirements carefully and be sure you complete each section. Section One – Emotional Intelligence and Leadership: Explain how EI concepts improve leadership skills. How does understanding and managing emotions make a more effective leader? Section Two – Personal Leadership Assessment: Conduct a personal leadership situational assessment using the critical moment dialogue approach. Describe a chaotic or stressful situation you experienced (in just a few sentences) and the specific actions you took in the situation. Describe ways you could have better managed your reaction to the situation, using the leadership resources you located. Explain how this new insight might influence your personal leadership development. Section Three – Personal Leadership Brand Statement: Based on the results of your STAR assessment, personal leadership situational assessment, and EI assessment, propose a personal leadership brand or style that is authentic, reflects your personality and strengths, and capitalizes on your EI. Condense your personal leadership brand into two words that best describe your style. You can test your proposed leadership brand by asking colleagues for feedback. Include a so that statement for your brand that demonstrates how your leadership style adds value to your organization. Example: "My leadership brand is collaborative accountability so that I can facilitate effective teamwork towards meeting the organization's goal to deliver X clinical and Y financial outcomes." Section Four – Personal Leadership Model: Analyze how you can combine your leadership strengths, emotional intelligence, and personal leadership brand into a leadership model that aligns with organizational culture and strategic goals and can guide organizational success. Be sure your analysis includes evidence and support from the resources you located. Specifically, address the following: Leadership strategies to guide highly effective teams. How your leadership approach might be influenced by financial forecasts. How your leadership approach reflects the mission and values of the organization, as well as professional and personal ethics. Additional Requirements Structure: Include a title page and reference page. Length: No required minimum length. Be substantive, thorough, and concise. References: At least five current credible professional resources. Format: APA format for references and citations only. Font: Times New Roman font, 12 point, double-spaced. Required Resources The following resources are required to complete the assessment. The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley. (n.d.). Test your emotional intelligence. Retrieved from http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/ei_quiz/#16 Cherry, K. (n.d.). What's your EQ? About.com. Retrieved from http://psychology.about.com/library/quiz/bl_eq_quiz.htm SHOW LESS Suggested Resources The resources provided here are optional and support the assessment. They provide helpful information about the topics. You may use other resources of your choice to prepare for this assessment; however, you will need to ensure that they are appropriate, credible, and valid. The Organizational Leadership and Governance Library Guide can help direct your research. The Supplemental Resources and Research Resources, both linked from the left navigation menu in your courseroom, provide additional resources to help support you. Emotional Intelligence Arunima, S., & Ajeya, J. (2014). Age and emotional intelligence of healthcare leaders: A study. Advances in Management, 7(7), 41–48. This study examines how emotional intelligence changes across age groups of health care leaders. du Plessis, M., Wakelin, Z., & Nel, P. (2015). The influence of emotional intelligence and trust on servant leadership. SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, 41(1), 1–9. This article looks at how emotional intelligence and trust can impact the effectiveness of servant leadership. Critical Reflection Maiden, G. (2017). Using reflection and visual representation to analyse and build leadership capacity, through a personal account of exemplary leadership. International Practice Development Journal, 7(2), 1–9. This article examines specific frameworks for critical reflection that were utilized in a program designed to build leadership skills and capacity. Middleton, R. (2017). Critical reflection: The struggle of a practice developer. International Practice Development Journal, 7(1), 1–7. This article discusses strategies to make critical reflection meaningful and overcome some of the challenges associated with this reflection strategy. Leadership Boak, G., Dickens, V., Newson, A., & Brown, L. (2015). Distributed leadership, team working and service improvement in healthcare. Leadership in Health Services, 28(4), 332–344. This article presents a case study about the use of distributed leadership strategies within a health care team to drive service improvements. Hargett, C. W., Doty, J. P., Hauck, J. N., Webb, A. M. B., Cook, S. H., Tsipis, N. E., . . .Taylor, D. C. (2017). Developing a model for effective leadership in healthcare: A concept mapping approach. Journal of Healthcare Leadership, 9, 69–78. This article presents a concept mapping exercise that was conducted to identify competencies and construct a health care leadership model. Rosenman, E. D., Ilgen, J. S., Shandro, J. R., Harper, A. L., & Fernandez, R. (2015). A systematic review of tools used to assess team leadership in health care action teams. Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 90(10), 1408–1422. A study that examines tools currently used to assess the quality and effectiveness of leaders in interdisciplinary health care teams. Personal Leadership Brand Rampersad, H. (2011). Matching your personal brand to that of your employer. Training & Management Development Methods, 25(2), 413–418. This article examines strategies for building a personal leadership brand that aligns with the values and interests of an employer. Shirey, M. R. (2010). Building your personal leadership brand. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 24?(1), 11–13. This article examines the ways in which building a personal leadership brand can help you enhance professional value and workplace influence. Ulrich, D., & Smallwood, N. (2009). Five steps to building your personal leadership brand. Infonomics, 23?(2), 32–35. This article presents a five-step process for building a personal leadership brand and adapting to keep it relevant as you and the industry changes. Ledlow, G. R., & Stephens, J. H. (2018). Leadership for health professionals: Theories, skills, and applications (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett. Available in the courseroom via the VitalSource Bookshelf link. Chapter 9, "Leadership and The Complex Health Organization: Strategically Managing the Organizational Environment Before It Manages You," on pages 210–245.

Budget: $23.00

Due on: December 27, 2019 00:00

Posted: 3 months ago.

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