Student: Stanley

Chapter 3: Methodology

(25) to thirty-five (35) pages in length; although, different projects will require more or less material here. This chapter reflects and expands upon the research methodology described in the proposal and approved by the Liberty University Institutional Review Board. It should give the reader a step-by-step explanation of the approach the researcher used to identify research project participants at the ministry site, and how ‘buy-in’ from the participants for the project was achieved. What materials were produced to facilitate the research? The research should offer a complete narrative on the progress of the research project, and initial responses of the participants. How will the researcher establish a baseline for measuring change? How did the researcher collect the data throughout the project? This chapter should have the feel of a video of the research process. The reader should be able to see the set-up, the process, and the conclusion of the project. This result can be achieved in two steps: intervention and implementation. ***Be very specific about what activity will be measured for change. ***Be very specific on how information will be recorded Intervention Design The intervention design should directly address the ministry context problem and research question posed in chapter 1. It should also reflect the research choices made in chapter 2. This section is the most creative of the project. The researcher reports their designed approach to addressing the problem outlined in chapter 1. The researcher should keep the intervention simple however complex the problem, and that the results should be measurable. It may be that the project intervention may address only one aspect of the problem. The intervention plan must be focused on the actual problem, simple to implement, and measurable. The whole process of the intervention needs to be outlined in this chapter. Sensing uses the analogy of a recipe. He lists the following ‘ingredients’: The tools for gathering information needed—Recording equipment, observers, field note protocols, etc. Protocols for using tools (precise recipes); notes about training others who might use your protocols (e.g., participant observers) The analysis/evaluation procedures and methods re quired (e.g., coding of data) Explain how the task supports the purpose and objective How will the data collected be analyzed? Will diagrams or charts be used to illustrate results? A general rule of thumb is that it is best to measure twice and cut once. By carefully laying out the elements of the intervention plan, the researcher will find implementation easier to execute, even if unexpected elements arise. Implementation of the Intervention Design The researcher should keep careful notes as the research project intervention proceeds. The researcher should keep an after-action notebook and record immediate impressions after each planned event. If trained observers are part of data-gathering, the researcher should arrange an after-action meeting shortly after each planned event to make sure important details are recorded. This section of chapter 3 should offer a narrative of the implementation and collection of data. How was the observation done? Sensing highlights the concept of ‘triangulation’ to enhance observation. Triangulation allows the researcher to cross-check the accuracy of the data. It is vital that the researcher clearly identify the sort of cross-checking that will be done for data. Sensing suggests a simple system. The researcher should use his or her own observations, an outsider’s observation, and an insider’s observation. In addition to the researcher’s own field participant observer notes, the researcher could gather insider participant data using response questionnaires/ surveys or moderated focus groups/interviews. The researcher should also seek out feedback from an outside expert, such as a faculty

Budget: $210.00

Due on: May 03, 2020 00:00

Posted: 6 months ago.

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